Saturday, December 26, 2009

 

2009 MLA Offsite

Tuesday, December 29, 7:00 PM
Philadelphia

The Rotunda
4014 Walnut Street
(entrance in back)

Readers will include
CA Conrad, Frank Sherlock, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Ron Silliman, Gregory Laynor, Aldon Nielsen, Bob Perelman, Adrian Khactu, Danny Snelson, Bill Howe, Carlos Soto Román, Jamie Townsend, Laura Moriarty, Jenn McCreary, Chris McCreary, Lisa Howe, Tyrone Williams, Timothy Yu, Sueyeun Juliette Lee, CS Carrier, Ryan Eckes, James Shea, Eric Selland, Charles Cantalupo, Jennifer Scappettone, Thomas Devaney, Pattie McCarthy, Evie Shockley, Barrett Watten, Carla Harryman, Michael Hennessey, Ish Klein, Suzanne Heyd, Kim Gek Lin Short, Jason Zuzga, Nava EtShalom, Julie Phillips Brown, Jacob Russell, Matthew Landis, Sandra Lim & more

& don’t forget

Tuesday, December 29, 5:15 pm
Coming in from the Cold:
Celebrating Twenty Years of the MLA Off-Site Poetry Reading

Philadelphia Marriott
Liberty Ballroom Salon A
Open to the public!

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Friday, December 25, 2009

 

Jee Hwang

is the first recipient of
the Emma Bee Bernstein
Emerging Artist Fellowship

& will have a solo exhibition
at A.I.R. Gallery
111 Front Street, Brooklyn
from January 6 thru 31

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Thursday, December 24, 2009

 

The Poetry Foundation invited nine writers, myself included, to address the question of “How has poetry changed in the last ten years?” Travis Nichols edited the feature, trying to get nine authors who might address different aspects of the overall scene. The other writers include Matthew Zapruder, Annie Finch, Rigoberto González, Marjorie Perloff, Brent Cunningham, Camille Dungy, Francisco Aragón, & Eileen Myles. The feature has been up for a few days (see that first link or click on the photo). I wrote on the role of technology change over the past decade. Since it appeared, Don Share has written some very nice words about my piece. And Henry Gould, one of my own private oxpeckers, offers his perspective at length in Don’s comments stream.

Since Don felt permitted to quote my entire little note on his blog, I guess I can do the same here, except that I want to note that you should read all of the other contributions to this feature as well. And I should add that, ten years ago, the Poetry Foundation would never have thought to invite this particular set of poets & critics to address this sort of question – that in itself is a significant phenomenon of the new decade.

Poets blogging is just a symptom. The decline of indie bookstores, including the closure of such stalwarts as Cody’s & Shaman Drum, is just a symptom. The slow painful death of newspapers, most of whom have already tossed their book review section and literary critics overboard, is itself just a symptom. The collapse of academic literary journals – viz. TriQuarterly, Southern Review & Poetry Northwest, three of my first publishers – is just a symptom. Trade publishers openly speculate that they may be next, and even universities are starting to fear that their turn may be coming. They’re right.

Just as MFA programs have pumped the number of poets writing and publishing in the United States up from a few hundred a half century ago to tens of thousands today, the major institutions that not only embodied all of this activity but served an important (if hotly contested) gate-keeping function are now all being undermined or transformed by the ongoing revolution in communications technology. The poet’s relationship to his or her audience is undergoing a profound transformation. The poet’s relationship to the institutions and even to tools of her or his practice is doing likewise. Everything is up for grabs.

Some poets have chosen to embrace the new with everything from flarf to technology-based visual poetries. Others have decided that the “timeless” values of tradition will outlast even this. They recall and sometimes reiterate the archaeologist’s maxim that ultimately hard copy is truth. If you can’t dig it up in 5,000 years, did it ever exist? Ian Hamilton Finlay, with his stone-carved minimal texts, may outlast us all.

What’s apparent is that (a) this joyride isn’t over, and (b) we’re all in this together. When I realize that any chapbook publisher with a Blogspot page and PayPal account can sell directly to readers worldwide, I feel hopeful. I just hope we can find time to read & enjoy this great bounty.

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Wednesday, December 23, 2009

 

Photo of Karen Finley by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Women of the Avant-Garde:
2 podcasts from Ubuweb (via Harriet)
(part 1) (part 2)

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Talking with Jordan Davis

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Peter Watts,
beaten & busted at the US border

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The Journal of British & Irish
Innovative Poetry
Birkbeck launch event’s
talks by Andrea Brady,
Caroline Bergvall & Robert Hampson

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Prismatic Publics
4 generations of Canadian
post-avant feminism

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Ron Silliman & the Future of Poetry”

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I’m makin’ a list
& I’m checking it twice…

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The Christmas tree in literature

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Wayne Wang & Paul Auster:
Auggie Wren’s Christmas Story

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Readings from
Does the Secret Mind Whisper?
A Celebration of Bob Kaufman

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Talking with Lydia Davis

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Ken Irby & Ironquill

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Rosmarie Waldrop on George Oppen

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Rexroth & Zukofsky

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Remembering Carl Rakosi

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Nostalgia & enunciation
in the work of Basil Bunting

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I whale, you Ahab

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That old punster, Ho Chi Minh

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“What is my poem’s carbon footprint? ”

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Writing in trains

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Most popular PoemTalks

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What’s the buzzword for 2009?

Best neologisms of the decade --
meh

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Roman Jakobson:
“Linguistics & Poetics”
(reg. req.)

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Lorca’s grave turns up empty

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Talking with Orhan Pamuk

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Dick of the Dead,
our guide to the underworld

Opening with your strongest poem

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Poetry on the train in Jakarta

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Being a white reader
of African-American poetry

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20 Poems of Georg Trakl
chosen & tranlated by
James Wright & Robert Bly

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The Harryette Mullen translation game

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Best translated book award: poetry

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Books that get translated

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Philosophy prof won’t go to jail
for unauthorized Derrida translations

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David Foster Wallace grammar challenge

Where Infinite Jest is a best seller

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2 bad-ass anthologies

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The relentless pursuit of beauty:
Ed Snow’s Rilke

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Making rare books fun

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Dickinson’s vispo

“Dickinson is not a zombie!”

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Milorad Pavić has died

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Thom Donovan
on the poetics of sight

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Fady Joudah on Mahmoud Darwish

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Talking with Terry Pratchett

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Reading Agatha Christie
in search of alzheimer’s

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The correspondence of
Leslie Marmon Silko & James Wright

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Top row poetics

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Inhabiting the poem

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Correction of the Year
is itself imperfect

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Looking for Walt Whitman in Camden

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2 books by Dan Beachy-Quick

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Ted Burke’s
“Best Books of the Decade”

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A look back at the noughties

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SPD’s best selling poetry for ‘09

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10 Canadian poetry volumes
for the 21st century

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No poetry from Library Journal’s
best books of ought-nine
(but a thriller from the author of
The Poet!)

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Best Poetry of the Year
from the Poetry Foundation Staff

Best Poetry Books,”
The SF Chronicle selection

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The year in British Quietism
was downright noisy

& some just for Christmas

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Poetry best-sellers of 2009

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Best unread books of the decade”

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What The New Yorker crowd read in ‘09
(Muldoon recommends Waldrop’s Baudelaire)

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A decade in books”

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Just how bad was this decade for books?

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The sexiest poem of the year

Frank Sherlock’s “Over Here

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Top Ten Mystery Lists
(multiple)
Summer Brenner’s I-5 is on lots of them

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The Village Voice list

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Your best books of ‘09”

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Twinkle, twinkle, School of Q…

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Talking with Mike Young

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11 best book cases

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Vernon Frazer’s
Improvisations,
all 699 pages thereof

Much of Frazer’s work is downloadable
or can be ordered here

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Chinua Achebe:
The Education of a British-Protected Child

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The battle for Troy
over Homer’s ghosts

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What happens when you say “Lolita”?

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Reviews of books
on literature & war

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Gertrude Stein
in the Picasso Room

@ the Philly Museum of Art
January 3

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The good, the bad, the “good bad

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The body as text

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Edward P. Jones:
from MFA to Pulitzer in 22 years

All Aunt Hagar’s Children

The stories of Edward P. Jones

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United States Artists’ grants announced

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3-minute poetry

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A snarky digest of
The Unbearable Lightness of Being

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Of Dogtown

Excerpt

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The great Poe debate continues

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No pantheon for Camus

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Tips on writing from Dr. Seuss

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Walcott gets his poetry professorship

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A poem is not a puddle

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The mask of Dickens

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The Robert Burns Zombie Cottage

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Restoring Samuel Johnson

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Talking with John Balaban

W.D. Ehrhert:
“Words for John Balaban”

An appreciation of John Balaban

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Jura whisky releases a book by John Burnside

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Not a brooding poet
claims Simon Armitage

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Charlie Simic:
poetry in bed, prose at the desk

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Donne’s Holy Sonnets
are 400 years old

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Charles Wright reading

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Jeanette Winterson on Patricia Highsmith

Jonathan Lethem on Highsmith

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The poetics of resentment

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Reading can change your brain

Readers born vs. readers made

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The featured author is the new
Ekleksographia
is Jack Foley

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Why Kafka’s manuscripts
still speak volumes

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In the West Village
Left Bank Books
may yet survive

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Despairing video-game poetry

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What is a story worth?

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Court to Google:
stop scanning French books

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Publishers fight the future

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Stephen Covey bypasses publishers,
sells e-rights straight to Amazon

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Random’s retro rights grab

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Should e-books be copy protected?

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E-book naming conventions

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Late fees for the Nook

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Editor & Publisher
will publish in January,
but that may be it

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10 resolutions for journalism in 2010

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Dave Eggers saves journalism

Or maybe not

Seriously not

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The last chapter for Borders UK

Books Etc founders attend the wake

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Out in the West Texas town of Laredo
there’s not a bookstore anywhere in sight

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David Kipen’s exit interview

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Connecting to writing in new ways

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Twitterature

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Some new Celan translations

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Download all of Dee Sunshine’s books for free

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Coming in February:
John Ashbery at the 92nd St. Y
with Marcella Durand, John Gallaher & Robert Elstein

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Fred Chappell & Robert Morgan

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e-reading Emerson

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A history of Charis Books in Atlanta

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Talking with Adelle Stripe & Darran Anderson

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In Faber & Faber’s archives

There never was a second Faber

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Overdue book returned
99 years later

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Anarchy at the NYPL

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The fetish of hard copy

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America’s great poetic visionary

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Chaucer for dummies

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Stealing words from Auschwitz

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Jack Spicer’s Young Goodman Brown

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Richard Hugo in Italy

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Pedro Pietri’s The Masses are Asses

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Anne Waldman’s
Red Noir
adapted & directed by
Judith Malina
@ the Living Theater

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Steve Benson’s
Views of Communist China

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Rain Taxi’s
annual auction is under way!

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Silver linings in NEA audience survey

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Maggie O’Sullivan:
visual works 1972 – 1995

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Erwin Panofsky:
On the Relationship of Art History & Art Theory
(reg. req.)

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Schwabsky on abstraction

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Manny Radnitzky of Philadelphia
& who he became

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LA Times’
10 most fascinating museum shows of ‘09

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Talking with Arthur Danto

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Making art in Kibera

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Carmen Herrera & the love of a straight line

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Starkers in Ashland

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The architecture of paper

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Talking with Tosh Berman

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“Picasso, I want my face back

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The Malibu rock

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The Birth & Death of the Cool

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Close reading Kind of Blue

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An Appointment with Mr. Yeats

Celebrating the Waterboys

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The CFO with her banjo & her Grammy

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The latest impossible Terry Gilliam film

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Patti Smith, the movie

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Obama’s arts policy – the word is caution

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Women of the Year

3 books that rethink feminism

A feminist “weekly reader

The “Nancy Meyers Effect

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Evangelicals as intellectuals

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Redicovering democratic Leninism

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What it’s like
in all the other universes

Multiverse

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The man who refused the Fields Medal

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Did the west invent Arab homosexuality?

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What the future looks like

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But, until then,
the designers for next season’s
Project Runway
(starting Jan. 14)

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It would appear
that Saturday’s “Walking Poem”
may have been written by
Dr. Hugo Heyrman

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