Saturday, May 24, 2008

 

George Oppen Centennial Symposium
Poets House, NYC
(MP3s of the entire event!)

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Professor denied tenure over flarf

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Students expelled for writing, collage

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Jon Carroll,
humiliated by P-R-I-V-I-L-E-G-E
for Small Press Distribution

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Paul Hoover on Proceduralism & Chance Poetics

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Rachel Blau DuPlessis’ Blue Studios:
Poetry and Its Cultural Work

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Stephen Romer’s Yellow Studio

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PEN translation award goes to
Rosmarie Waldrop

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Lyn Hejinian’s Little Book
of a Thousand Eyes

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Peter Gizzi on Barbara Guest

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What differentiates
bad poetry from good

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MP3s of KCRW’s Bookworm program:
Clayton Eshleman (forthcoming, May 29)
Ariana Reines
Eileen Myles & Maggie Nelson
Bob Hass

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Will Barnes & Noble buy Borders?

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Suzanne Vega wrestles with
the problems of composition

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Tao Lin Week at 3:AM Magazine
Day Four
Day Three
Day Two
Day One

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

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The Geraldine R Dodge poetry lineup:
Forrest Gander, C.D. Wright,
Brenda Hillman & a whole lot
of the
School of Q.

The festival of literary magazines
in New Jersey

looks like a lot more fun

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Talking with Ruth Fainlight

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Honor Moore’s memoir of her father

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Talking with Henry Rollins

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William Burroughs, Jonathan Williams & d.a. levy

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Emma Sovich has won
the best campus writing award
in the country

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Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul

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A tremendous achievement

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Milton is not better than Shakespeare
but he’s still pretty good

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Are writers made or born?

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The poetry of John Haines

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Gary Snyder, voice of the wild

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Using Lulu to return rare books to print

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In Cardiff Castle gentleman’s room

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Joan Houlihan on the question
of who reviews women at CPR,
and how

Kathleen Rooney’s review
of Elizabeth McFarland
triggered this

Daniel Hoffman’s preface to the book

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Stephanie Norgate & Tamara Fulcher

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Remembering Sarah Hannah

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Backing Duffy for laureate

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Borrowing the voice of Helen Keller

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The e-publishing / © quandry

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Bush appointees trash EPA libraries

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An empiricist cheers for Alan Sokol

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The politics of theory

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Politics? I don’t got show you
no stinkin’ politics…

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Mingus: The Clown

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Misunderstanding Nina Katchadourian

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The hottest music ticket in California:
The ROVA / Nels Cline Celestial Septet

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The gaze of the artist & the female muse

Lucian Freud’s “Benefits Supervisor
weighs in

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Michael Rossman has died

FSM Archive

Michael’s blog

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Friday, May 23, 2008

 

If you aren’t already a passionate addict of the Sci-Fi series, Battlestar Galactica, now in the midst of its fourth – and final – season, I wouldn’t recommend that you start now, for reasons that will become evident shortly. If you are, however, you are being treated to some of the very best theater in the history of the medium. The drop-off in quality between Battlestar and, say, The Sopranos, is enough to give one a nose bleed.

Readers of this blog will know that I respond strongly to the quality of writing both in film and television. If, as I’ve argued before, the finest single hour in fiction television history is the “Two Cathedrals” episode of West Wing – the Mrs. Landingham’s funeral / National Cathedral / swearing at God in Latin / rain-drenched president being asked if he will run for a second term, having hidden his MS for much of the first (not to mention the flashbacks to Bartlett’s prep school days) season-ending episode that concludes with the late John Spencer’s words “Watch this” – every episode of Battlestar seems to be at least in that range. This puts it up there with some of the very best extended television ever – the first season, say, of Twin Peaks or the miniseries version of Angels in America.

I know I’m not alone in this impression. The gazillions of users of IMDB.com give Battlestar a rating of 9.1 on a scale of ten. While IMDB doesn’t rank TV shows, it’s worth noting that only two motion pictures in history rate that high – The Godfather and Shawshank Redemption – and none rank higher. The Sopranos does score higher overall, with a 9.5, and Band of Brothers ranks higher yet, at 9.6, in the mini-series category, which IMDB for some reason does track. Still, these are all rarified heights. Let’s just say that there’s a consensus as to the quality of Battlestar G.

This is not to confuse this series with its 1970s antecedent by the same name, which starred Lorne Greene in the role of Commander Adama, Richard Hatch¹ as Captain Apollo & Dirk Benedict as Lieutenant Starbuck. That series lasted just 21 episodes, tho it does score a respectable 7.1 rating from IMDB users. But it’s little more than a springboard from which the current series’ producers & writers took flight. In the current version, Starbuck is a woman (Katee Sackhoff in the most macho role on TV), Apollo is now Admiral Adama’s son. Edward James Olmos, long a terrific character actor (viz. Bladerunner) who heretofore has gotten leading roles primarily when the character was supposed to be Hispanic, plays Adama, Mary McDonnell is the other big name star (she was nominated for Oscars for Dances with Wolves and Passion Fish), playing a Secretary of Education who is the lone surviving member of the political administration on the planet Caprica when it is nuked out of existence by rebel androids called Cylons. With roughly 40,000 survivors – whoever was off-world on a space ship at the moment of attack – the humans anoint her president and decide to make a run for the mythical planet of their ancestors, earth.

That’s as much of the plot as I can give for the simple reason that the show has roughly one major plot twist every fifteen minutes. Over four seasons, that’s a lot. But even over one show, that’s extraordinary. Miss an episode and you’re hopelessly confused one week later. Why are we in an alliance with Cylons? Why is the president working with the traitorous Gaius Baltar? Why is the president talking to The Hybrid?

The secret of Battlestar Galactica, however, is neither its acting – tho it’s been first-rate throughout, nor its direction (like The Sopranos, there have been a lot of directors, even including Olmos) – but the writing of Ronald Moore, a Cornell poli-sci grad who cut his teeth as a television writer/producer on Star-Trek: The Next Generation & Deep Space Nine, and who is the chief writer here. Like West Wing when Aaron Sorkin was writing all of its shows, Galactica works because of the incredible density of its plotting & the sharpness of its dialog, with a coherence that is possible only when one person is responsible for guiding the vision. Thus, as I’ve noted here before, one episode found Chief, the head mechanic for Galactica’s fleet of one-person attack vessels (Vipers), organizing a work stoppage over issues of justice & put the exact words of Mario Savio’s famous “shoulder against the wheel” speech right into the character’s mouth. Toward the end of last season, four of the 12 models of Cylons discovered for the first time that they were, in fact, androids living among the humans when they began to hear what sounded like music reverberating from ship’s electronics. The song that was audible only to them turned out to be “All Along the Watchtower.”

A lot of the very best television, anything with a serious or complex story arc (think West Wing, Twin Peaks or even Max Headroom back in the day), tends to run into the network suits after a season or two, demanding stories that are more self-contained. That’s what allows a series to build an audience, because viewers can come & go at will. But the really best TV does just the opposite – it starts with its maximum possible audience and gradually loses those who can’t keep up. Invariably the suits win. The network, after all, is their toy. Declining revenue is never their idea of a good time. But when forced to live with permanent modularity, these shows all sag & dissipate very quickly.

You could tell almost the exact moment with Sorkin abandoned West Wing – it ramped downward to an entropic close, even as it projected what could have been an exciting presidential race being won by a post-racial ethnic patterned after none other than the junior senator from Illinois. Or remember when David Lynch checked out of Twin Peaks – the second season was a sad shadow of the first and its final episode ended up being directed by the attorney who put together the financing for Elephant Man. In its most recent episode, Battlestar had a major plot element driven by a dream sequence that occurred a season ago. How many viewers can be expected to get that? How many members of the audience are going to catch the words of Mario Savio? Or consider the period on the planet New Caprica when Saul Tigh, Admiral Adama’s right-hand man, put together a group of suicide bombers, right at the moment when suicide bombings were daily occurrences in Baghdad? With those sorts of demands on the attention & allegiance on an audience, there is almost no direction for Battlestar’s audience to go but down. You can’t start in the middle and hope to make sense of anything. You just need to hie thee over to Blockbuster (or Netflix) and get what’s available on DVD, trusting that eventually you will get it all.

Which is why ending the series after the fourth season makes a lot of sense – tho there will be spin-offs, such as the prequel Caprica, due next season. The decision requires the show’s creators to finish this story arc before they lose any of their powers or their control. It will be fascinating watch them try to bring this rodeo to a grand finale. In the plot as it now stands, the Cylons have devolved into a civil war of their own. The humans on Galactica know seven of the twelve models of Cylon (all the rest are copies of these twelve). Viewers know four of the remaining five. And everybody is guessing about the fifth. Who will it be? (My vote all season has been the president – I still think it’s her.) Will the humans get to earth? Will Cylon & human be able to co-exist? What will become of the hybrid baby, Hera? What of the four Cylons living underground as human? Are they even on the same side as one another? The questions are rather endless.

As best I can tell, the series has 12 remaining episodes and is scheduled to end early in 2009. That means that there will be a hiatus, not necessarily a bad thing – the word on the street is that Moore & Co. reworked the entire fourth season during the writers’ strike. A hiatus now would just give them more opportunity to infuse even more subplots as this rollercoaster barrels toward its conclusion. This promises to be one hell of a ride.

 

¹ Hatch plays a minor role, that of Tom Zarek, in the current Battlestar, the only actor in both versions.

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Thursday, May 22, 2008

 

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Wednesday, May 21, 2008

 

Recently Received

 

Books (Poetry)

Mary Jo Bang, Elegy, Graywolf Press, St. Paul 2007

Peg Boyers, Honey with Tobacco, University of Chicago Press, Chicago 2007

Maria Mazziotti Gillan, All That Lies Between Us, Guernica, Toronto 2007

Jonathan Greene, Heart Matters, Broadstone Books, Frankfort, KY 2008

Daniel Hall, Under Sleep, University of Chicago Press, Chicago 2007

Mike Hauser, Close Gauge Petcock, no publisher, location or date listed

Mark Jarman, Epistles, Sarabande, Louisville 2007

Lisa Jarnot, Night Scenes, Flood Editions, Chicago 2008

Deborah Keenan, Willow Room, Green Door: New and Selected Poems, Milkweed Editions, Minneapolis 2007

David Kirby, The House on Boulevard St., Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge 2007

Bill Knott, Stigmata Errata Etecetera, Saturnalia Books, Philadelphia 2007

John Martone, Ordinary Fool, Dogwood & Honeysuckle, Charleston, IL 2008

John Martone, (seedling/eclipse), Dogwood & Honeysuckle, Charleston, IL 2008

John Martone, Syllables, Dogwood & Honeysuckle, Charleston, IL 2008

John Martone, A Cell, Dogwood & Honeysuckle, Charleston, IL 2008

John Martone, Asarum Canadense, Dogwood & Honeysuckle, Charleston, IL 2008

Karin Randolph, Either She Was, Marsh Hawk Press, New York 2008

James Scully, Donatello’s Version, Curbstone Press, Willamantic CT 2007

R. T. Smith, Outlaw Style, University of Arkansas Press, Fayetteville 2007

Sam Truit, Vertical Elegies: Three Works, Ugly Duckling Presse, Brooklyn 2008

 

Books (Poetry Anthology)

Zachariah Wells, Jailbreaks: 99 Canadian Sonnets, Biblioasis, Emeryville, Ontario 2008. Includes Milton Acorn, Margaret Avison, Ken Babstock, Leonard Cohen, Mary Dalton, Ralph Gustafson, Daryl Hine, Irving Layton, Malcolm Lowry, Gwendolyn MacEwan, John Newlove, Eric Ormsby, Molly Peacock, Stuart Ross, Goran Simić, Raymond Souster, Carmine Starnino, Phyllis Web, Gerry Gilbert, Peter Dale Scott, Richard Outram, more.

 

Books (Other)

Marci Nelligan & Nicole Mauro, Intersection, Chain/Links, Philadelphia & Oakland 2008. Includes work by Jane Jacobs, Paul Madonna, Claire Porter, William Pope.L, Mitchell Duneier, Melissa Ngo

2007 Pew Fellowships in the Arts, Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia 2008. Includes essays by Melissa Franklin, executive director, Pew Fellowships in the Arts, Joseph Melillo, executive producer, Brooklyn Academy Music, 2007 Panel Chair. 2007 categories: music composition, choreography, craft. Includes work by Charles O. Anderson, King Britt, Nicole Cousineau, Fritz Dietel, Ed Bing Lee, Gerald Levinson, Adelaide Paul, Peter Paulsen, Jamey Robinson, Kate Watson-Wallace, Dorothy Wilkie, Julie York. Includes both CD and a DVD (with 12 films about the artists).

 

Journals

Moonset Literary Newspaper, Spring/Summer 2008, La Pine, OR. Includes Shawn Bowman, Claudette Russell, b’oki, Kala Ramesh, Dawn Bruce, A. Thiagarajan, Chance, Walter Franceschi, “105 Indian Haiku Poets” translated by Angelee Deodhar, more.

Peaches and Bats, 2, 2008, Portland, OR. Includes Elizabeth Robinson, Colin Beattie, Sam Lohmann, Arthur Sze, Jeanne Lohmann, Lindsey Bolt, Robert Kelly, interviews with Kelly and with Dan Beachy-Quick, artwork by Michaela Curtis-Joyce & Lauren Likely.

The Peter F Yacht Club #8, Ottawa, 2007. Edmonton Issue. Includes Stephen Brockwell, Marita Dachsel, Amanda Earl, Jesse Ferguson, Laurie Fuhr, Clare Latremouille, Nicholas Lea, Roland Prevost, Marcus McCann, rob mclennan, Jonathan Meakin, Max Middle, Carla Milo, Paul Pearson, Monty Reid, Sandra Ridley, Christine Stewart

The Peter F Yacht Club #9, Ottawa, 2008. Fredericton Issue. Includes derek beaulieu, Amanda Earl, Jesse Patrick Ferguson, Laurie Fuhr, Nicholas Lea, rob mclennan, Max Middle, Roland Prevost, Monty Reid, Hugh Thomas

 

 

Other Media & Formats

John Martone, Peppers, Dogwood & Honeysuckle, Charleston, IL 2008 (folded paper inside envelope)

Withstand, no. 1, Winter 2008, no location given. Includes Michael Scharf, Dan Thomas-Glass, Juliana Spahr, Derek Henderson, Megan Kaminski, Joshua Clover, Ben Lerner, Ange Mlinko, Christopher Nealon, Rodrigo Toscano, Timothy Kreiner (unbound pages held together by bilingual loops of “danger/peligro” tape fastened with duct tape, order determined by assigning stock symbols to contributors names by initials & tracking for a period – Scharf must have been Microsoft).

 

 

Still catching up on all items received
since January 11.

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Tuesday, May 20, 2008

 

 

I’ve been struck this week by the value of different models of journal. Sitting on my desk are two that I’ve going through – one is the impressive 50th issue of Brad Morrow’s Conjunctions, which not coincidentally entitles this issue “Fifty Contemporary Writers.” At 500 pages with advertising, that comes maybe to nine pages per contributor, a substantial amount. There are no four-line or one-paragraph knock-offs just to get an auspicious name on the cover. Further, there are many writers here whose work I absolutely love: Peter Gizzi, Cole Swensen, Charles Bernstein, Lyn Hejinian, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, Rae Armantrout, Martine Bellen, Joan Retallack, Robert Kelly, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, John Ashbery, Ann Lauterbach. And there are others every bit as well known and accomplished in their own way: Edwidge Danticat, Joyce Carole Oates, Sandra Cisneros, Reginald Shepherd, Rick Moody, Christopher Sorrentino, Carole Maso, William H. Gass, editor Morrow himself, Andrew Mossin, Donald Revell, Thalia Field, Robert Coover. And the diligent among you will know already that there are still 25 other authors I haven’t even named yet, up-&-comers, hidden delights or maybe just people to whom I’ve not yet paid enough attention.

Next to this I have the single-signature, saddle stapled winter issue (no. 2) of Model Homes, which advertises itself as Poetry / Futures / Blueprints. It’s just 64 pages, divided among 12 contributors, 13 if you consider that one is a collaboration So roughly five pages per contributor, a briefer presentation. It’s edited out of Detroit by Marie Buck & Brad Flis. (Yes, two journals edited by a Brad – there’s a lot of Bradness going on these days.) It’s worth noting that, of Model Homes’ 13 contributors, I actually know & like the work of 11: Dorothy Trujillo Lusk, Tan Lin, Judith Goldman, Kit Robison, Robert Fitterman, Carla Harryman, Jennifer Scappettone, Tao Lin, Louis Cabri, the late Nancy Shaw & Catriona Strang. There are just two writers here who are new to me: Lawrence Griffin & Seth Landman.

Guess which journal I find myself spending more time with, and frankly enjoying more?

It’s not that the quality of writing differs radically from one journal to the next – Robinson, Fitterman & Harryman could all just as easily turn up in Conjunctions as in Model Homes. More could, actually, if Morrow had kept one eye turned to Canada. Many of the authors in Conjunctions – particularly from that first cluster of names above – could fit in Model Homes as well. Swapping Kit Robinson & Carla Harryman for, say, Lyn Hejinian & Rae Armantrout would hardly constitute a major change of direction for either publication.

Nor is size the major differentiator between the two journals, tho it’s true that one uses a 64-page magazine quite differently than one does a publication that weighs in at 500 pages. For what it’s trying to accomplish, each is well designed.

The difference between the two – the reason why Conjunctions is a nice-to-have publication while Model Homes is a must – is that Model Homes has a much sharper point-of-view. This isn’t to say that Conjunctions doesn’t have any focus – regular readers will be able to tell you what Brad Morrow’s likes & dislikes (or perhaps interests & disinterests) in contemporary poetry happen to be. For example, there is a bias toward complexity, which explains why the post-New American traditions he seems most to be interested in are (a) a post-projectivist thread (Robert Kelly would be an example), (b) the uptown visual-art conscious side of the New York school, (c) language poetry – tho not all of it – and (d) so-called Third Way poetics (Berssenbrugge, Lauterbach & Swensen in the current issue). There’s no visual poetry, nothing with a Beat flourish, no hint (at least in this issue) of Naropa. The closest one gets to the School of Quietude might be Reginald Shepherd, but he’d be one of the best arguments for itself the School o’ Q. could make.

Morrow’s take on prose is quite similar – the writers included all exude intelligence but I don’t sense an aesthetic center – Joyce Carol Oates writes a romance series under a pen name. She writes quickly & one imagines she writes constantly as well. That’s not an aesthetic I associate with William Gass or Edwidge Danticat. A substantial number of the prose writers, tho only one or two of the poets, publish with the New York trade presses.

In short, Conjunctions tends toward good writing, smart writing, all kinds. But one doesn’t necessarily experience an affinity between writer A & writer B here. A look at the table of contents gives one the sense that Morrow alternated writers for the sake of maximum contrast, an approach that evens out any argument the gathering might have made.

Model Homes, on the other hand, is very much interested in connecting the generation of poets that came of age in the 1970s with the present. It’s as militant as any issue of Roof or Temblor ever were. The issue has Tan Lin, who was in grad school in 1983 & is part of the larger circle associated with uncreative writing & vispo, as well as Tao Lin, born that same year. I can’t imagine Joyce Carol Oates or Robert Coover in this journal. That’s an understatement – and it’s to Model Homes’ advantage.

Where this really pays off for a reader is with the writers one has never heard of before. There are just two in Model Homes whereas Conjunctions has quite a few more, but Model Homes offers a far firmer sense of context in which to examine these newbies-to-me:Lawrence Giffin & Seth Landman. The reality is, I quickly realize if I search a little on the web, that I’ve read Giffin before – he did the fascinating (if problematic) piece on “Political Topology in Contemporary North American Poetry,” using Rod Smith’s Deed as evidence, in the current issue of Jacket. His two poems here, “The Plaything of My Thought” and “Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious,” make great use of found & other language to create statements that sound normative but really aren’t:

What do you call a daughter
without ever having seen one
before? Padding it’s trench-wear
with the destiny of eugenics,
you don’t. You just push off into
the ensuing catastrophe unequal
to itself.

Or

In the highly developed organisms
the receptive cortical layer
has long been withdrawn into
the depths of the interior of the body,
though portions of it have been left behind
on the surface, immediately beneath
the general shield set up against stimuli.

Both poems skirt the topic of incest in ways that are quite unlike anything I’ve read before, like a cooler, more aestheticized Kathy Acker, but not tending toward prose (in the usual sense) nor porn (in the usual sense). It’s the closest thing to a discursive Jeff Koons move I’ve read, flirting at once with being both sweet & icky.

Seth Landman’s poetry is “more lyrical,” if by that you mean that it relies less visibly on found linguistic source material. The thing that jumps out at me of his work in this issue is a poem called “Sign You Were Mistaken,” which has a terrific stanzaic structure:

Ocean arrived poking a star, that insurrection
of blood you

fear and gather

this could have been
painting with nails’ rust

hammering something up, “what are you up to,”

just another symbol for biennial or derived
from a gun wheel “did you find it” hacked

or frozen the scared sacred, the surviving child

”getting so big” as the intellect in action and apart
from family life there is friendship and apart

from the abstract is the city, the city upside down,

poison in the pilgrimage, why
”is difficult to explain,” but pouring over the diaries

you begin to notice.

This is, you might say, all one sentence. Or, more accurately, it retains its sentenciness, that sense of syntactic possibility, throughout even tho a wise person would be hard put to parse what goes on. This is a plausible next step in the logic, say, of an Ashbery poem, tho with most of the bric-a-brac removed, its only possible weak point perhaps that first and, a hinge word that is a dead give-away for the devices that follow. It’s one of three poems Landman has in the issue (albeit not starting on the page listed in the table of contents), and they do exactly what work in a magazine should – they make you hungry to read more.

All of these poets – Model Homes editors Buck & Flis, Giffin & Landman – have some connection to the Amherst area, even if it’s only historical. Landman makes his living it seems writing for ESPN. Giffin edits Physical Poetry as part of the amorphous L’il Norton gang, one publication of which is Model Homes. I can recall that Noah Eli Gordon was prevented from participating in an antiwar reading somewhere around Amherst circa 2003 on the grounds that his poetry wasn’t “clear” (in the sense of having more than one idea per poem). Now this area seems to be a hotbed of nuance, polyvalence & meta-meta. One wonders exactly how to account for this, tho we note the tell-tale presence in the vicinity of Peter Gizzi &, to the south, Elizabeth Willis, and recall that their presence at Santa Cruz & Mills a decade or so back coincided with the sudden rise of New Brutalism, reputedly responsible for rejuvenating the scene throughout the Bay Area.

Whatever – I’m learning to trust anything that has the mark of L’il Norton about it, which makes Model Homes one of the most exciting magazines I’ve seen all year. These folks, editors & contributors alike, have a real sense of what they want to do in poetry. And the result is a knock-your-sox-off argument for some new ways of looking at the poem.

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Monday, May 19, 2008

 

Counter-Revolution of the Word:
the rightwing attack on the avant-garde

Al Filreis on teaching & touching

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Aggression:
A Conference on Poetics & Political Antagonism

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Contemporary movements in Russian poetry

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On Briggflatts

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Bill Corbett reviews seven new books

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Philly’s 24th annual
Black Writing Festival

& here

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Omar Pérez, Cuba’s Zen poet,
literally is the son of Che

Talking with Pérez

Poems, more poems, a co-translation

A Pérez bibliography (with links)

Talking with Cuban poet José Kozer

§

Leslie Scalapino reading at the University of Chicago

Talking on poetics

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The defining issue of digital publishing - search

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T.S. Eliot tops Google’s hot list

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Kindle the death of print? Puh-leeze….

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“Who said print is dead?”

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Catalogs are toast

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A Daemon of self-publishing

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The new EPC page
for Tony Towle
has lots of samples of his work

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Haunted by Jerry Estrin

Vanishing Cab

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A Khrushchev promotes Nabokov

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Kent Johnson in Sarajevo

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A note on Paul Blackburn

Robert Kelly on Blackburn’s commitment to
the sound of poetry

Robert Sward & Jerry Rothenberg:
an exchange on
Blackburn

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China’s English-language lending library
is open until
2 AM

§

“If I’d taken college English seriously
I’d’ve become an accountant”

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She used to hate Emily Dickinson
& still doesn’t get it

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Auggie Kleinzahler on Scroggins’ Zukofsky
(subscription required)

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The Winterling Chapbook Project

§

Is Carol Ann Duffy
the first woman
vapid enough
to be
Britain’s laureate?

§

The avant-garde in Taipei

§

Talking with Leslie Dick & Jonathan Lethem
about Philip K. Dick (PDF)

Lethem’s “You Don’t Know Dick

§

Bill Sherman on the history of poetry
(some but not all relating to Philly &/or the Post Office)

tho he seems not to know about this

§

Ednafication

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Talking with Émile Beneviste

§

The immortal poet of Turkmenistan

§

Kurt Cobain, lyricist

§

Two books by Moniza Alvi

§

The dictionary without definitions

§

Where it’s McGonagall ahead of Dickens

§

On editing PRECIPICe

§

How to rescue criticism

And how not to.

§

The motor theory of language

§

Geof Huth on Bob Creeley, Hayden Carruth,
lapsed nephalism & more

§

Problems of haiku in German

§

In praise of the AlphaSmart

§

Talking with Roy Fisher

§

Linh Dinh on life in Missoula

§

roving dojo quote

§

Talking with Peter Riley

§

Isaac Rosenberg, 90 years after his death

§

The librarian’s newswire

§

The last general indie bookstore in the Bronx
will close in 4 to 6 weeks

§

Bookstores see no recession

§

Gary Hyland & Randall Maggs

§

Jonathan Yardley on John Steinbeck’s enduring popularity

§

Wombat, wombat, burning bright

§

West Hartford’s laureate looks back at her reign

§

“It will destroy Naipaul’s reputation forever”

§

Nam Le’s The Boat

§

The battle of the Chelsea Hotel

§

Little droppings of poetic process

§

Katha Pollitt on Charles Simic

§

Orphan © and/or ripping off artists

§

Writing students try to prevent open access to their mss.

§

Jasper Johns & the poetry of the NY School

§

“The art world is themeless
heading in no direction”

§

Hal Foster on Richard Serra

§

Who is Larry Gagosian anyway?

§

Female masters

§

Washington Post on Robert Rauschenberg

The Guardian obit

Remembering Rauschenberg

Barbara Rose in the Wall Street Journal

David Byrne on Rauschenberg

LA Times appreciation

“an orchestrator for a platoon of assistants”

Jed Perl, debunking Rauschenberg’s work

§

A favorite in this year’s Turner shortlist?

§

Bourgeois at the Pompidou

§

John Perreault on Jeff Koons

§

The Barnes is doomed

§

The sexual politics of the Bauhaus

§

Killing live art

§

An architectural masterpiece
”complete with Wharton Esherick kitchen”
goes up for sale at Christie’s

§

The nakba quilt
commemorates
the death of a nation

§

The bachelor’s degree is obsolete

§

University museum director dies in custody

§

The utility of philosophy

§

Terry Eagleton on anonymity

§

New music on the Internet Archive

§

David Byrne:
Architecture as music
(or is it vice versa?)

§

Cronenberg vs. the censors

§

Many links today
from the new Jacket,
excellent as always

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