Wednesday, September 26, 2007

 

Kay Rosen, Blurred

Transcendental
one-liners

§

Talking with
Pattie McCarthy

§

An obit of
Bill Griffiths

§

A fractal reading
of
Spring and All

§

Maurice Blanchot
at 100

§

A profile of
Kay Ryan

§

Alan Wald’s
proletarian modernism

§

Talking with
Stuart Hall

Rivington Place

§

An English view
of Muldoon’s ascent

& Condé Nast

(More Irish need apply,
indeed)

Muldoon
on writing songs

“Most of the Time”
sung by Muldoon’s band,
Rackett
(MP3)

§

Books-by-the-foot

§

Actor portrays
Bukowski
in solo show

What memorial
for Bukowski?

§

A poet’s walk
already in
Los Angeles

§

Lee Herrick
& the
SoQ tradition
of Valley Poets

§

The social value
of writing

§

Talking with
Staceyann Chin

§

Poetry & film
in Bollywood

§

Poets & perverts

§

Remembering
Tamizh Oli

§

Translating
Kamal Khujandi

§

This week’s
death-of-a-bookstore article
concerns Librería Lectorum

§

Borders in the U.K.
is bought

§

The British Library
fights for funding

§

What Shakespeare
looked like
as a boy

§

The Kenyon Review
launches
literary fest

§

Two poets profile
their own work

§

Learning English

§

Which is the takata
& which the malooma?

§

The home of
James Whitcomb Riley

§

Comparing Cate Marvin
to Hopkins & Yeats

§

In search
only of
uplifting arts

§

Mark Strand
returns to
Salt Lake City

While
Richard Wilbur
reads at
Bryn Mawr

§

The value
of an agent

§

In the U.K., dismay
that a Pamela Anderson clone
outsells
the entire Man Booker shortlist

(Note the chart in that
first article in the Telegraph,
showing that five
of the six Booker finalists
have sold just 10,000 books
between them)

§

Black women philosophers

§

The designers hired for
the “new Barnes

§

MassMoCA wins
right to show
disputed installation

§

Nan Goldin
photo
(owned by Elton John)
busted as porn

§

Germaine Greer
on
Jane Bown

§

Mr. Freud
has a lady
on the couch

§

Philip Glass’s epic
Appomattox
debuts in SF
October 5

§

Sasha Frere-Jones
on
Miles Davis’
Complete On the Corner Sessions

§

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