Sunday, April 22, 2007

 

John Chamberlain
at 80

§

Pianist
Andrew Hill
has died

§

All
of Ezra Pound’s
recorded poetry
downloadable
on MP3s

§

Avant-gardener

§

Can this really be
the first anthology
devoted entirely
to poems
about
Brooklyn?

§

Why literary awards can be useful

§

But when they don’t work:

Of the 1,006 words
Washington Post writer
Bob Thompson
uses to discuss
the “non-journalism” Pulitzers
awarded last week,
exactly 9
are devoted to poetry

Scott Timberg
of the LA Times
devotes
even fewer

8 out of 692,
the first of which is
and

Jeffrey Burke
of Bloomberg News
devotes 51 words
from his allotment of
679

§

And when prizes do work:

More on the Pulitzer
for Ornette Coleman

§

Knopf took away
three Pulitzers

§

On the process
& politics
of the
Pulitzer for drama

§

30 years
of the Pushcart

§

The London Book Fair
&
the art of the deal

§

Wilma Elizabeth McDaniel,
”the Okie poet,”
has died

§

Talking with
Sonia Sanchez

§

Talking with
Michael Ondaatje

§

Anny Ballardini’s
extensive
Poet’s Corner

§

A profile of
James Weldon Johnson,
Paul Dunbar
&
Langston Hughes

§

Franz Douskey
is sometimes
the last to know
what he’s writing

§

Another article
on the potential demise
of
Chicago’s
Women and Children First

§

At the
Atlanta Journal Constitution,
it’s the book review editor
that has been found
unnecessary

§

A profile of
Kathleen Peirce,
one of the
Guggenheim Nine

§

The writing of
Cho Seung-Hui

§

Using Cho’s videos
as an opportunity
to advertise

§

Trying to find
meaning
in
”axismael”

§

Test driving
the Sony Reader

§

The book as fetish

§

Some retro-jazz
and Billy Collins

§

A literacy program
for
the Prime Minister

§

Plus Dana & Laura
at a museum
named for Mr. Barnum

§

As good a defense
of Geoffrey Hill

as I’ve ever read

§

No academic publisher
left behind

§

Anglophilia
goes North

§

Trying to pair up
John Lennon
&
Kate Smith
for a duet

§

Impressionism
& the aging eye

§

How to think
about visual art

§

Return of the repressed:
abstraction is back

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